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TitleTwo moderate earthquakes near Montreal: 10 October and 6 November 2012
AuthorBent, A L; Peci, V; Halchuk, S; Hayek, S
SourceSeismological Research Letters vol. 85, no. 4, 2014 p. 940-947, https://doi.org/10.1785/0220140008
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20130307
PublisherSeismological Society of America
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceQuebec; Ontario
NTS31B; 31G; 31H; 31I; 31J
AreaMontreal; Ottawa
Lat/Long WENS-76.0000 -72.0000 47.0000 44.0000
Subjectsgeophysics; seismicity; earthquakes; earthquake magnitudes; earthquake foci; aftershocks
Illustrationslocation maps; plots; profiles; stereonets
ProgramCanadian Hazard Information Service, Canadian Hazard Information Service
AbstractOn 10 October 2012 a moderate, mN 4.5, earthquake occurred in the Montreal region. Although it did not cause any damage it was felt throughout the region and at distances to a few hundred km. The earthquake was very well recorded allowing its source parameters, such as focal mechanism and depth, to be determined. Both the regional moment tensor inversion and first motion methods indicate predominantly thrust faulting on a northwest striking plane, which is typical of the West Quebec Seismic zone in which the earthquake occurred. A depth of 13-15 km was indicated by the regional moment tensor inversion and by the regional depth phase method. The moment magnitude of 3.7 is slightly smaller than would be expected based on the average mN-MW relation but well within the range of observed values for previous earthquakes. More than 10 000 felt reports were received via an internet ¿Did You Feel It¿ page. A few weeks later, on 6 November 2012 another moderate (mN 4.2, MW 3.9) earthquake occurred in the West Quebec Seismic Zone but in a different location near the Quebec-Ontario border. This event also had a northwest predominantly thrust mechanism. Depths obtained by regional moment tensor and depth phase methods were both in the 6-8 km range. Over 2500 online felt reports were received. The earthquakes provided a successful test of recent changes made to handle high volumes of internet traffic that typically occur after a significant earthquake felt in a large, urban area.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
On 10 October 2012 a moderate, mN 4.5, earthquake occurred in the Montreal region. Although it did not cause any damage it was felt throughout the region and at distances to a few hundred km. The earthquake was very well recorded allowing its source parameters, such as focal mechanism and depth, to be determined using several methods which gave consistent results. The earthquake appears to be typical of the region. More than 10 000 felt reports were received via an internet "Did You Feel It" page. A few weeks later, on 6 November 2012 another moderate (mN 4.2) earthquake occurred in the West Quebec Seismic Zone but in a different location near the Quebec-Ontario border. This earthquake is also typical of the region. Over 2500 online felt reports were received. The earthquakes provided a successful test of recent changes made to handle high volumes of internet traffic that typically occur after a significant earthquake felt in a large, urban area.
GEOSCAN ID293285