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TitleShaking and impacts from the October 2012 magnitude 7.7 earthquake near Haida Gwaii
AuthorBird, A L; Halchuk, S; Rosenberger, A
SourceSeismological Society of America 2013 annual meeting, abstracts; Seismological Society of America, Proceedings no. 84:2, 2013 p. 361
Year2013
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20130184
PublisherSeismological Society of America (SSA)
MeetingSeismological Society of America annual meeting; Salt Lake City; US; April 17-19, 2013
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formathtml
ProvinceWestern offshore region; British Columbia
NTS102O; 103B; 103C; 103F; 103G; 103J; 103K
AreaHaida Gwaii; Queen Charlotte
Lat/Long WENS-134.5000 -130.0000 54.5000 51.0000
Subjectsgeophysics; earthquake studies; earthquakes; earthquake magnitudes; earthquake risk; earthquake mechanisms; earthquake foci; tectonic setting; aftershocks; landslides; tsunami
ProgramCanadian Hazard Information Service, Canadian Hazard Information Service
LinksOnline - En ligne
AbstractLast October's magnitude 7.7 earthquake in the region of Haida Gwaii, Canada (formerly the Queen Charlotte Islands) is the second largest recorded in Canadian history. It was felt throughout British Columbia and as far away as the Yukon, Alberta and Montana, roughly 1500 km from the epicentre. In some locations (notably on Haida Gwaii), the perceivable shaking lasted 1.5 - 2 minutes, with very strong shaking for about 30 seconds. Strong motion seismometers recorded ground motions at three locations in the region, to a maximum horizontal acceleration of 0.2 g. Nevertheless, this earthquake resulted in very limited damage partly due to the population centres being located at least 80 km from the epicentre and 60 km from the fault rupture, but also due to the generally low, wood-frame construction on the islands. While relatively little visible impact and few, minor injuries resulted, many people were significantly traumatized by the experience and the numerous felt aftershocks. We will examine the various physical effects (e.g. landslides, building damage, loss of hot springs) from the shaking by this large earthquake, catalogued by NRCan field crews and by the inhabitants of Haida Gwaii. We also determine how the intensities gleaned from analysis of eye-witness accounts may have been affected by the rupture dynamics of the earthquake and the effects of surface materials as a guide toward the potential impact on the various Haida Gwaii communities from future large earthquakes. October's earthquake may also be used as a proxy for earthquakes in other, more populated areas of British Columbia, Canada and the world.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
October 2012's magnitude 7.7 earthquake is the second largest recorded in Canadian history. It was felt throughout British Columbia and as far away as the Yukon, Alberta and Montana, roughly 1500 km away. Nevertheless, this earthquake resulted in limited damage partly due to the population centres being located at least 80 km from the epicentre and at least 60 km from the fault rupture. While little visible impact and few, minor injuries resulted, many people were significantly traumatized by the experience, and the numerous felt aftershocks. The earthquake also caused a tsunami of several metres' height, along an uninhabited coastline.
GEOSCAN ID292909