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TitleInvestigating the dynamic properties of Leda Clays in Eastern Canada
AuthorCrow, H; Leboeuf, D; Sivathayalan, S; Motazedian, D; Cascante, G
SourceESSSA 2013, 85th Annual Meeting of the Eastern Section of the Seismological Society of America, program; 2013 p. 38
Year2013
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20130176
PublisherSeismological Society of America
Meeting85th Annual Meeting of the Eastern Section of the Seismological Society of America; LaMalbaie; CA; October 6-8, 2013
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
File formatpdf; html
ProvinceOntario; Quebec
NTS22F/01; 31G/05; 31G/12
AreaChamplain Sea; Ottawa; Gatineau; Baie-Comeau
Lat/Long WENS -76.0000 -75.5000 45.7500 45.2500
Lat/Long WENS -68.5000 -68.0000 49.2500 49.0000
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; clay analyses; clays; clay mineralogy; terrain analysis; terrain sensitivity; soil properties; soil morphology; seismicity; Champlain Sea; Cenozoic; Quaternary
ProgramAssessing Earthquake Geohazards, Public Safety Geoscience
LinksOnline - En ligne
AbstractThe Champlain Sea sediments in Eastern Canada known as "Leda Clays" are particularly prone to amplified ground motions during weak shaking due to large impedance contrasts between soft soils and high-velocity bedrock. However, current knowledge of the dynamic properties which govern their behaviour at different strain levels and frequencies of shaking is limited, and this understanding is critical in making design decisions for civil infrastructure. Therefore, seismologists, engineers, and geophysicists from the Universities of Laval, Carleton, Waterloo, and the Geological Survey of Canada, with support from industry partners Hydro- Québec and Qualitas, are undertaking a three-year joint study investigating soft soil response to shaking, including the frequency- and strain-dependence of damping, shear wave velocity, and cyclic shear strength properties of Leda Clays. This will involve laboratory and in situ studies at three soil sites near Ottawa, ON, Gatineau, QC, and Baie- Co meau, QC where large diameter samples (127 - 200 mm) have been collected. The project will be divided into three themes examining: (1) small strain properties at the sample scale using laboratory methods, compared with in situ properties using surface and downhole geophysical testing to assess the "large scale" influence of strat igraphy and depth. Theme 2 will investigate large strain properties of the samples using triaxial methods, and direct simple shear methods to characterize cyclic resistance ratios under varying loading modes and depths. Theme 3 will model linear and nonlinear ground motion using finite element and finite difference methods incorporating the results of themes 1 and 2, and recorded earthquake data from the region. Ultimately, we anticipate the outputs from all themes will improve the design of existing and new infrastructure, thereby influencing the safety of 7 million Canadians who live in urban areas along the Ottawa-Quebec City corridor.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The Champlain Sea sediments in Eastern Canada, known as Leda Clays, are particularly prone to amplified ground shaking during weak earthquakes. However, current knowledge of the soil properties which govern motion at higher shaking intensities is limited, and this understanding is critical in making design decisions for civil infrastructure. Therefore, seismologists, engineers, and geophysicists from the Universities of Laval, Carleton, Waterloo, and the Geological Survey of Canada, with support from industry partners Hydro-Québec and Qualitas, are undertaking a three-year joint study investigating soft soil response to earthquake shaking. This will involve laboratory and in situ studies at three soil sites near Ottawa, ON, Gatineau, QC, and Baie-Comeau, QC. Ultimately, we anticipate the project outputs will impact the design of existing and new civil infrastructure in the region, thereby influencing the safety of 7 million Canadians who live in urban areas along the Ottawa-Quebec City corridor.
GEOSCAN ID292893