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TitleComparison of geomechanical deformation induced by megatonne-scale CO2 storage at Sleipner, Weyburn and In Salah
AuthorVerdon, J P; Kendall, J M; Stork, A L; Chadwick, R A; White, D J; Bissell, R C
SourceProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America vol. 110, no. 30, 2013 p. E2762-E2771, https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1302156110
LinksSupplemental Data - Données supplémentaires (PDF, 1.53KB)
Year2013
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20130107
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf; html
AreaSleipner; Weyburn; In Salah; Norway; Canada; Algeria
Subjectsgeochemistry; gas storage; geomechanical deformation; microseismic monitoring; InSAR; geomechanics
Illustrationsdiagrams; location maps; histograms; plots; stereograms
ProgramCarbon Capture & Storage, Environmental Geoscience
AbstractGeological storage of CO2 that has been captured from large, point source emitters represents a key potential method for reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. However, this technology will only be viable if it can be guaranteed that injected CO2 will remain trapped in the subsurface for thousands of years or more. A significant issue for storage security is the geomechanical response of the reservoir. Concerns have been raised that geomechanical deformation induced by CO2 injection will create or re-activate fracture networks in the sealing caprocks, providing a pathway for CO2 leakage. In this paper we examine three large-scale sites where CO2 is injected at rates of approximately 1 megatonne/year or more: Sleipner, Weyburn, and In Salah. We compare and contrast the observed geomechanical behaviour of each site, with particular focus on the risks to storage security posed by geomechanical deformation.
At Sleipner the large, high permeability storage aquifer has experienced little pore pressure increase over 15 years of injection, implying little possibility of geomechanical deformation. At Weyburn, 45 years of oil production has depleted pore pressures prior to increases associated with CO2 injection. The long history of the field has led to complicated, sometimes non-intuitive geomechanical deformation. At In Salah, injection into the water-leg of a gas reservoir has increased pore pressures, leading to uplift and substantial microseismic activity. The differences in the geomechanical responses of these sites emphasise the need for systematic geomechanical appraisal prior to injection in any potential storage site.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
Geological storage of CO2 that has been captured from large, point source emitters represents a key potential method for reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. However, this technology will only be viable if it can be guaranteed that injected CO2 will remain trapped in the subsurface for thousands of years or more. A significant issue for storage security is the geomechanical response of the reservoir. Concerns have been raised (e.g., Zoback and Gorelick) that geomechanical deformation induced by CO2 injection will create or re-activate fracture networks in the sealing caprocks, providing a pathway for CO2 leakage. This study examines this risk, comparing and contrasting deformation induced at three large-scale CCS sites ¿ Sleipner (Norwegian North Sea), Weyburn (Canada) and In Salah (Algeria). These sites show very different geomechanical responses, highlighting the importance of systematic geomechanical appraisal prior to injection, and comprehensive, multi-faceted monitoring during injection at any future large-scale CCS operations.
GEOSCAN ID292729