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TitleA hypothetical geomechanics model for the assessment of potential environmental impact of shale gas fracking - Part II: implication for induced seismicity
AuthorWang, B
SourceGeoMontréal 2013, Proceedings of the Canadian Geotechnical Conference; 2013 p. 1-7
Year2013
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20130050
PublisherThe Canadian Geotechnical Society
MeetingGéoMontréal 2013, the 66th Canadian Geotechnical Conference and the 11th Joint CGS/IAH-CNC Groundwater Conference; Montreal; CA; September 29 - October 3, 2013
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper
File formatpdf
Subjectsfossil fuels; environmental geology; geophysics; shales; environmental impacts; environmental studies; structural features; faults; models; modelling; Utica Shales; shale gas; fracking
Illustrationslocation maps; cross-sections; plots
ProgramShale Gas - groundwater, Environmental Geoscience
AbstractThis paper presents a hypothesis that large scale hydraulic fracturing of gas shale for natural gas extraction causes disturbance to the shale. In turn, it causes stress re-distribution within the overall rock structure. Faults nearby may react to such change and be subject to additional strain. The response may extend to a depth several kilometres greater than that associated with isolated hydraulic fracturing pressures. A discontinuum model was used for this study. It was applied to the Utica shales in Quebec. Results from the model confirmed the hypothesis. However, the observed magnitude of fault deformation was found to be small. The estimated potential seismicity associated with such deformation is consistent with the observations reported by others, i.e. small magnitude events.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This paper presents a hypothesis that large scale fracturing of gas shale for natural gas extraction causes reduction of the shale stiffness. This in turn causes stress re-distribution within the geological structure. Faults may react to such change and deform. The response may extend to a greater depth than that associated with isolated hydraulic fracturing pressures. A discontinuum model was used and the Utica shale case was analyzed. The model confirmed the hypothesis. However, the magnitude of fault deformation was observed to be small. The estimated potential seismicity associated with such deformation is consistent with the observations reported by others.
GEOSCAN ID292581