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TitleAnalysis and reprocessing of airborne gravity gradiometer data over the Strange Lake rare earth deposit, Québec-Labrador
AuthorKeating, P; Pilkington, M
SourceThe Leading Edge vol. 32, no. 8, 2013 p. 940-947, https://doi.org/10.1190/tle32080940.1
Year2013
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20130027
PublisherSociety of Exploration Geophysicists
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf; html
ProvinceNewfoundland and Labrador; Quebec
NTS24A/01
AreaStrange Lake
Lat/Long WENS-64.5000 -64.0000 56.2500 56.0000
Subjectsgeophysics; economic geology; geophysical surveys; gravity interpretations; gravity surveys; gravity surveys, airborne; gravity; igneous rocks; intrusive rocks; mineral occurrences; mineral deposits; magnetic surveys; magnetic interpretations; spectral analyses; Strange Lake Deposit
Illustrationslocation maps; profiles; plots; magnetic maps; gravity profiles
ProgramMethodological Development, Targeted Geoscience Initiative (TGI-4)
ProgramRare-Metal Ore Systems, Targeted Geoscience Initiative (TGI-4)
AbstractA high-resolution airborne gravity gradiometer survey was flown in March 2012 over the Strange Lake intrusive complex, located on the border of Québec and Newfoundland and Labrador. This survey provided an opportunity to better understand the performance and
limitations of this technology and also investigate potential improvements to the associated data processing. Airborne gravity gradient data low-pass-filtered at 75 m, rather than the standard 300 m, were provided by the contractor for this purpose. One flight line was reflown several times and used to assess the repeatability of the data, showing that in this particular area, the airborne gradient gravity system has a fullsine (wavelength) resolution of about 700 m. The system can therefore detect anomalies having a width of about 350 m. We also found that for gradiometer data, kriging is a better interpolator than low-pass filtering combined with minimum curvature gridding. Using kriging, line-to-line correlation (and in some cases, resolution) appears slightly improved.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
The high-resolution airborne gravity gradiometry survey flown in March 2012 over the Strange Lake intrusive provides an opportunity to better understand the performance and limitations of this technology and also investigate potential improvements to the associated data processing. Gravity gradiometry detects density variations within the Earth, however a rare earth deposit is located within the survey area could not be detected because it does not have a large enough density contrast. The system can detect anomalies having a width of about 350 m. We found that for that type of data kriging is a better interpolator that low-pass filtering combined with minimum curvature interpolation. Line to line correlation is improved and in some cases resolution is slightly improved.
GEOSCAN ID292531