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TitleAdapting Hazus for seismic risk assessment in Canada
AuthorNastev, M
SourceCanadian Geotechnical Journal vol. 51, no. 2, 2014 p. 217-222, https://doi.org/10.1139/cgj-2013-0080
LinksHazus Canada
Year2014
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20120462
PublisherNRC Research Press
MeetingGéoMontréal 2013, the 66th Canadian Geotechnical Conference and the 11th Joint CGS/IAH-CNC Groundwater Conference; Montreal; CA; September 29 - October 3, 2013
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf; html
Subjectsengineering geology; health hazards; seismic risk; earthquake risk; earthquakes; floods; landslides; analytical methods; geological hazards
ProgramQuantitative risk assessment, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractAlthough earthquakes have been recognised as major natural hazards with the potential to cause loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption in Canada, most risk and emergency managers still lack the necessary tools and guidance to adequately undertake rigorous risk assessments. Recently, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) has adopted Hazus, a standardized best-practice methodology developed by the US Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for estimating potential losses from common natural hazards, such as earthquakes, floods, and hurricanes. Hazus combines science, engineering knowledge, and mathematical modelling with geographic information systems technology to estimate physical damage and economic and social losses. Besides the ground shaking, the earthquake model considers landslide, liquefaction, and fault rupture susceptibilities. Depending on the severity of the resulting transient ground motion and permanent ground deformation, five potential damage states (none, slight, moderate, extensive, complete) are employed to estimate the amount of structural damage and consequent economic and social losses. This note reports some of the typical features of the recently adapted Hazus earthquake model, with an emphasis on the considerations of earthquake-induced hazards, and overviews the ongoing activities and potential challenges in implementing this model in Canada.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
It has been recognized that Canadian risk and emergency managers presently lack the necessary standardized tools and guidance to adequately undertake rigorous risk assessments. In the scope of respective mandates, NRCan has initiated collaboration with the departments of Environment, Defence and Public Safety to promote widespread usage of the U.S. FEMA's natural hazard risk assessment tool Hazus among the full range of Canadian decision makers. Hazus combines science, engineering knowledge, and mathematical modelling with geographic information systems technology (GIS) to estimate physical damage, economic and social losses. The earthquake model considers the following earthquake related hazards: ground shaking, landslides, liquefaction and fault rupture. Based primarily upon the intensity of the transient ground motion and the permanent ground deformation, four potential damage states are employed to estimate the amount structural damage and consequent economic and social losses.
GEOSCAN ID292410