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TitleA new high-resolution radiocarbon Bayesian age model of the Holocene and Late Pleistocene from core MD02-2494 and others, Effingham Inlet, British Columbia, Canada; with an application to the paleoseismic event chronology of the Cascadia Subduction Zone
AuthorEnkin, R J; Dallimore, A; Baker, J; Southon, J R; Ivanochko, T
SourceCanadian Journal of Earth Sciences vol. 50, 2013 p. 746-760, https://doi.org/10.1139/cjes-2012-0150
Year2013
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20120199
PublisherNRC Research Press
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceBritish Columbia
NTS92F/02
AreaEffingham Inlet
Lat/Long WENS-125.0000 -124.7500 49.2500 49.0000
Subjectsgeophysics; marine geology; sedimentology; Holocene; magnetic susceptibility; sediments; cores; radiocarbon dates; sedimentation rates; erosion; seismicity; Cascadia Subduction Zone; core MD02-2494; seismites; Quaternary
Illustrationsanalyses
ProgramTargeted Hazard Assessments in Western Canada, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractAnnually laminated sediments from the anoxic inner basin of Effingham Inlet, Pacific coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada, yield a high-resolution 42mpaleoenvironmental record, from the present to about 14 ka 14C BP (17 ka cal BP). A new age model, based on 68 radiocarbon dates from twigs and small plant material, from the 40mcore MD02-2494 and 2 m freeze cores from the surface, is anchored by the Mazama Ash and varve counting. A Poisson-process sedimentation model is used, applying a new method to determine the Poisson k value, giving a realistic age model compatible with the multi-proxy core data. Twenty-one "seismites", which are lithofacies in the Effingham cores that may be representative of seismically triggered mass-wasting events, are identified and dated precisely, then compared with the chronology of the deep-sea turbidite record farther south in the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ), to determine if regional sediment disturbances can be identified.
With 16 proposed correlations, Effingham seismite ages are 169 ± 206 years older than turbidite ages estimated largely by radiocarbon analysis of foraminifera in hemipelagic deposits.
GEOSCAN ID291841