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TitleGeochemical landscapes
DownloadDownload (whole publication)
AuthorGrunsky, E C; McNeil, R J; Garrett, R G
SourcePresentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010; by Rencz, A N (ed.); Kettles, I M (ed.); Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 6645, 2011 p. 16; 1 CD-ROM, https://doi.org/10.4095/287940
LinksCanadian Database of Geochemical Surveys, downloadable files
LinksBanque de données de levés géochimiques du Canada, fichiers téléchargeables
Year2011
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
MeetingWorkshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment; Halifax; CA; March 17-18, 2010
Documentopen file
Lang.English
MediaCD-ROM; on-line; digital
RelatedThis publication is contained in Rencz, A N; Kettles, I M; (2011). Presentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010, Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 6645
RelatedThis publication is related to Friske, P W B; Ford, K L; Kettles, I M; McCurdy, M W; McNeil, R J; Harvey, B A; (2010). North American soil geochemical landscapes project: Canadian field protocols for collecting mineral soils and measuring soil gas radon and natural radioactivity, Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 6282
RelatedThis publication is contained in Rencz, A N; Kettles, I M; (2011). Presentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010, Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 6645
File formatpdf
ProvinceBritish Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Subjectsgeochemistry; soils science; environmental geology; environmental analysis; environmental studies; environmental impacts; soil geochemistry; soils; soil studies; soil samples; soil properties; heavy metals contamination; pollution; pollutants; biogeochemistry; biogeochemical surveys; geochemical surveys; Cenozoic; Quaternary
Viewing
Location
 
Natural Resources Canada Library - Ottawa (Earth Sciences)
 
Natural Resources Canada library - Calgary (Earth Sciences)
 
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
 
Natural Resources Canada library - Vancouver (Earth Sciences)
 
Natural Resources Canada library - Québec (Earth Sciences)
 
ProgramEcosystems Risk Characterization, Environmental Geoscience
Released2011 01 01
AbstractA geochemical landscape is the geochemical characterization of a given part of the earth based on the joint influence of climate, relief, geology and vegetation on the chemical processes over a region. The primary purposes for assessing geochemical landscapes are for: agriculture, mineral exploration, environmental and human health studies and are carried out through geochemical surveys.
The scale of a geochemical survey determines the sampling density and is generally focused on the scale of the geochemical process that is being measured. A rule of thumb is that the sample density should be 1/2 the size of the geochemical target being sought. Sample density and the spatial extent of a geochemical survey dictate the overall number of sites for the survey,
Influences on the geochemistry of soils in Canada are characterized by the ecozone classification, regional bedrock geology and soils. The North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project (NASGLP) was designed to capture the geochemical variability of the continent at the Ecoprovince level at a spacing of one sample site per 40 km2. Sample design is an essential element of a geochemical survey. There are at least two ways to design a geochemical survey that is statistically defensible. The Generalized Random Tesselation Stratified Design (GRTS) is based on a spatially balanced selection of points over an area. Alternatively, an unbalanced, nested random sample design based on a designated sample resolution permits the use of statistical techniques such as analysis of variance to test the representivity of the data.
Ecoregion designation is well established across Canada at the zone, region and district levels. Soil and bedrock geology maps have been compiled by various provincial territorial agencies but are not continuous across the country.
The vertical profile of soils varies widely across the country. Northern soils are dominantly cyrosols and brunosols. Both the west coast and eastern part of Canada are dominated by podzolic soils and the western interior plains are dominated by chernozemic and luvisolic soils. The nature of the soil profile plays a role in the geochemical response that is observed from the base of the C horizon to the upper most layers.
GEOSCAN ID287940