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TitleWhat's in a number
DownloadDownload (whole publication)
AuthorKlassen, R A
SourcePresentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010; by Rencz, A N (ed.); Kettles, I M (ed.); Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 6645, 2011 p. 12; 1 CD-ROM, https://doi.org/10.4095/287938
LinksCanadian Database of Geochemical Surveys, downloadable files
LinksBanque de données de levés géochimiques du Canada, fichiers téléchargeables
Year2011
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
MeetingWorkshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment; Halifax; CA; March 17-18, 2010
Documentopen file
Lang.English
MediaCD-ROM; on-line; digital
RelatedThis publication is contained in Rencz, A N; Kettles, I M; (2011). Presentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010, Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 6645
RelatedThis publication is related to Friske, P W B; Ford, K L; Kettles, I M; McCurdy, M W; McNeil, R J; Harvey, B A; (2010). North American soil geochemical landscapes project: Canadian field protocols for collecting mineral soils and measuring soil gas radon and natural radioactivity, Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 6282
RelatedThis publication is contained in Rencz, A N; Kettles, I M; (2011). Presentations and recommendations from the workshop on the role of geochemical data in environmental and human health risk assessment, Halifax, 2010, Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 6645
File formatpdf
ProvinceBritish Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Subjectsgeochemistry; soils science; surficial geology/geomorphology; environmental geology; environmental analysis; environmental studies; environmental impacts; soil geochemistry; soils; soil studies; soil samples; soil properties; heavy metals contamination; pollution; pollutants; biogeochemistry; biogeochemical surveys; glacial deposits; tills; geochemical surveys; Cenozoic; Quaternary
Viewing
Location
 
Natural Resources Canada Library - Ottawa (Earth Sciences)
 
Natural Resources Canada library - Calgary (Earth Sciences)
 
Geological Survey of Canada (Atlantic)
 
Natural Resources Canada library - Vancouver (Earth Sciences)
 
Natural Resources Canada library - Québec (Earth Sciences)
 
ProgramEcosystems Risk Characterization, Environmental Geoscience
Released2011 01 01
AbstractIn risk assessment, environmental and human health protection is informed by scientific knowledge of hazard. For earth materials, including bedrock and its overlying mantle of unconsolidated mineral particulate, risk for geochemical hazard is based on element concentrations - numbers, established in biological testing.
In showing that hazard potential varies with mineralogy, and that mineral composition varies among geological terranes, geoscience shows that no single element concentration can establish a universal measure of acceptable risk in earth materials.
Risk assessment requires knowledge of sample grain size and mineral partitioning among grain size fractions, as well as of the wet chemical digestion used for analyses. In showing how geology affects both the measure of risk and its interpretation, geoscience also shows that regulatory approaches must evolve to accommodate the natural variability that is an inherent characteristic of earth materials.
As natural geochemical background variation - the reference level for industrial liabilities, originates in mineralogy, itsvariation may be simplified in terms of geological provenance, process, and past. For unweathered earth materials, geological maps and models establish a stable and deterministic reference framework for ecological hazard potential. With increase in weathering and soil formation, however, there is increasing need incorporate other natural sciences, including pedology and biology, in risk assessment.
GEOSCAN ID287938