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TitleEvaluating the major controls on permafrost distribution in Ivvavik National Park based on process-based modelling
AuthorWang, X; Zhang, Y; Fraser, R; Chen, W
SourceGeo2010, proceedings of the 63rd Annual Canadian Geotechnical Conference and the 6th Canadian Permafrost Conference, proceedings; 2010 p. 1235-1241 (Open Access)
LinksOnline - En ligne (PDF, 308 KB)
Year2010
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20100099
MeetingGeo2010: 63rd Canadian Geotechnical Conference and the 6th Canadian Permafrost Conference; Calgary; CA; September 12-16, 2010
DocumentWeb site
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
RelatedThis publication is related to Wang, X; Zhang, Y; Fraser, R; Chen, W; (2011). Evaluating the major controls on permafrost distribution in Ivvavik National Park based on process-based modelling, Geological Survey of Canada, Scientific Presentation no. 9
File formatpdf (Adobe® Reader®)
ProvinceYukon
NTS117A/12; 117A/13; 117A/14; 117B/09; 117B/16; 117C/01; 117C/08; 117C/09; 117D/03; 117D/04; 117D/05
AreaIvvavik National Park; Firth River
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -138.0000 69.7500 68.5000
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; Nature and Environment; Science and Technology; permafrost; freezing ground; ground ice; ground temperatures; vegetation; modelling
Illustrationslocation maps; histograms; tables; graphs
ProgramClimate Change Geoscience, Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation for Key Economic and Natural Environment Sectors
Released2010 09 01
AbstractThe permafrost status at some representative sites in three typical land types (as mountain tops, coastal plains, and river valleys) in Ivvavik National Park was evaluated using a process-based model. The results showed that ground conditions were the most important factor controlling the Active Layer Thickness (ALT). ALT in rocky or gravel ground was deeper (80 - 220 cm), whereas peaty or clay soil made ALT shallower (25 - 50 cm deep) in the park. Active-layer is usually deeper in mountain sites due to the rocky ground conditions. Air temperature is another significant factor affecting both ALT and permafrost thickness. ALT has become significantly deeper since the mid 1980s corresponding to the climate warming.
GEOSCAN ID287421