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TitleMmin - Implications of its choice for Canadian seismic hazard and seismic risk
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AuthorHalchuk, S; Adams, J
SourceProceedings of the 9th U.S. National and 10th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering/Compte Rendu de la 9ième Conférence Nationale Américaine et 10ième Conférence Canadienne de Génie Parasismique; 2010, 8 pages, https://doi.org/10.4095/285375
Year2010
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20100048
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, General Information Product 71
Meeting9th US National and 10th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering / La 9ième Conférence Nationale Américaine et 10ième Conférence Canadienne de Génie Parasismique; Toronto, ON; CA; July 25-29, 2010
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
RelatedThis publication is contained in Adams, J; Halchuk, S; Awatta, A; Adams, J; Halchuk, S; Awatta, A; (2010). Estimated seismic design values for Canadian missions abroad; Estimated seismic design values for Canadian missions abroad; Estimated seismic design values for Canadian missions abroad; Estimated seismic design values for Canadian missions abroad; Estimated seismic design values for Canadian missions abroad; Estimated seismic design values for Canadian missions abroad, Proceedings of the 9th U.S. National and 10th Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering
File formatpdf
Subjectsseismology; seismicity; seismic interpretations; seismic risk; seismic models; seismic energy; earthquakes; earthquake magnitudes; earthquake risk; earthquake studies
Illustrationsgraphs; histograms
ProgramCanadian Hazard Information Service, Canadian Hazard Information Service
AbstractProbabilistic seismic hazard analyses consider the contribution of ground motions from a range of magnitudes. The choice of maximum magnitude (Mmax) is often the source of considerable debate. However, the choice of minimum magnitude (Mmin) can also have a significant effect on the resulting hazard. This is especially true for peak ground acceleration (PGA) and short period hazard values in regions of low seismicity where the majority of the hazard contribution comes from small earthquakes at nearby distances. This is doubly so in eastern North America where PGA ground motions are high in amplitude, even from relatively small magnitude events. Long period hazard, and hazard for all periods calculated for low probabilities are minimally affected by the choice of Mmin. When hazard values are applied to liquefaction analysis or to the design of short-period structures, especially non-brittle ones, it appears one has to decide whether the true "scientific" hazard (contributions from all earthquakes) or an "engineering" hazard from earthquakes larger than a minimum-magnitude cutoff is appropriate.
GEOSCAN ID285375