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TitleEarthquake site response studies in Canada: past, present, and future
AuthorCassidy, J F
SourceCanadian meteorological and oceanographic society, abstracts volume; 2010, 1 pages
LinksOnline - En ligne
Year2010
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20100022
MeetingCMOS-Canadian Geophysical Union Meeting; Ottawa, ON; CA; May 31-June 4, 2010
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
ProvinceBritish Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Subjectsgeophysics; earthquakes; earthquake risk; earthquake studies; seismicity; seismic risk
ProgramTargeted Hazard Assessments in Western Canada, Public Safety Geoscience
AbstractMore than 75% of Canada's population lives in urban centres. Many of the these centres, including Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa, Victoria, and Quebec City, are located in seismically active regions. Large earthquakes around the world, including 1995 Kobe, 1985 Mexico City, and 1994 Northridge, have clearly demonstrated a significant variation in shaking across an urban area. Ground shaking is altered by surficial geology, basin structure (both shallow and deep), resonance effects, and bedrock topography. Amplification factors of ten or greater (relative to bedrock) have been observed, and the variation in shaking clearly contributes to the observed damage patterns (both the amount of damage, and the type of building stock that is impacted). In Canada, large earthquakes have also shown the importance of local site effects. For example, damage patterns from the 1944 M 5.6 Cornwall earthquake and the 1988 M 5.9 Saguenay earthquake showed enhanced damage on the soft Leda clays along the St. Lawrence and Ottawa Valleys. Damage in Victoria, BC from the M 7.3 central Vancouver Island earthquake of 1946 (200 km distant) was largely concentrated in areas of soft clay pockets and old peat bogs. One of the first attempts at seismic microzonation in Canada was based on local geology and the observed effects of the 1946 earthquake in Victoria. In recent years, significant advances in geological and geotechnical mapping techniques (e.g., detailed results from seismic reflection/refraction), combined with larger seismic data sets (including weak, and strong ground shaking, as well as ambient noise recordings) have contributed to an improved understanding of various site effects. In this presentation, I summarise some of the past and present earthquake site response studies in urban areas of Canada, and outline some recent advances (as well as some of the challenges) in this field that will help reduce losses from future earthquakes.
GEOSCAN ID263349