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TitleRhenium and its potential in Canadian mineral deposits
AuthorSinclair, W D; Jonasson, I R
SourceProspectors and Developers Association of Canada Annual Meeting 2010, abstract volume; 2010, 1 pages
Year2010
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20090359
MeetingProspectors and Developers Association of Canada Annual Meeting 2010; Toronto; CA; March 7-10, 2010
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediaon-line; digital
ProvinceBritish Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Subjectseconomic geology; mineral potential; mineral deposits; porphyry deposits; porphyry copper; molybdenite; Anna Lake Deposit; Redstone Deposit; Rhenium
ProgramSouthern Cordillera TGI-3, Targeted Geoscience Initiative (TGI-3), 2005-2010
AbstractRhenium was the last of the naturally-occurring elements to be discovered, in 1925, and the first significant commercial application, in platinum-rhenium catalysts, was not developed until the 1960s. In recent years, because of its high melting temperature (3180°C), its most important application has been in high-temperature superalloys used to make turbine blades for jet engines. In the latter application there is no substitute for rhenium, and demand for this rare metal caused the price to rise as high as $10,000/kg ($311/oz) in 2008. The price has since fallen to about $6000/kg ($187/oz), which ranks it as the seventh most expensive traded metal.
Rhenium is similar geochemically to molybdenum and is concentrated primarily in molybdenite, particularly in porphyry deposits, which are the principal source of rhenium. Molybdenites from porphyry copper and copper-gold deposits have the highest contents of rhenium, typically ranging from 200 to 2000 ppm Re, although some (e.g., Kemess South, Mitchell) contain more than 4000 ppm Re. Molybdenites from porphyry molybdenum deposits contain much less rhenium, generally within the range of 10 to 100 ppm Re. Elevated contents of rhenium, ranging from 0.5 to more than 20 ppm Re, are also present in sediment-hosted copper deposits such as Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan and in the Kupferschiefer of Poland and Germany, which are the second most important source of rhenium. Sediment-hosted copper deposits in Canada, such as Redstone (NWT), have comparable rhenium contents and represent significant potential rhenium resources. Rhenium has also been recovered as a byproduct from uranium deposits in the U.S. and Uzbekistan. Uranium deposits in Canada with potential for rhenium recovery include the Anna Lake deposit in Labrador. The recently-discovered Merlin deposit in Australia is an unusual, high-grade molybdenum-rhenium deposit of uncertain type that has not yet been recognized in Canada.
GEOSCAN ID261568