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TitleTectonics and metallogeny of the British Columbia, Yukon and Alaskan Cordillera, 1.8 Ga to the present
AuthorNelson, J; Colpron, M
SourceMineral deposits of Canada: a synthesis of major deposit-types, district metallogeny, the evolution of geological provinces, and exploration methods; by Goodfellow, W D (ed.); Geological Association of Canada, Mineral Deposits Division, Special Publication no. 5, 2007 p. 755-791
Year2007
Alt SeriesNatural Resources Canada, Contribution Series 20170069
PublisherGeological Association of Canada, Mineral Deposits Division (St. John's, NL, Canada)
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; DVD; digital
RelatedThis publication is contained in Goodfellow, W D; (2007). Mineral deposits of Canada: a synthesis of major deposit-types, district metallogeny, the evolution of geological provinces, and exploration methods, Geological Association of Canada, Mineral Deposits Division, Special Publication no. 5
File formatpdf
ProvinceBritish Columbia; Yukon
NTS82; 92; 93; 94; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114; 115; 116; 117
AreaAlaska; Cordillera; Canada; United States
Lat/Long WENS-160.0000 -114.0000 71.0000 48.0000
Subjectseconomic geology; tectonics; mineral deposits; mineral occurrences; mineral potential; mineralization; exploration; mineral exploration; metallogeny; mineral deposits genesis; tectonic environments; tectonic evolution; tectonic history; tectonic stages; rifting; Cordilleran Orogen; Arctic Alaska terrane; Farewell Terrane; Alexander Terrane; Paleozoic; Cambrian; Ordovician; Silurian; Devonian; Pennsylvanian; Mississippian; Carboniferous; Permian; Mesozoic; Jurassic; Triassic; Cretaceous; Tertiary; Quaternary; Cenozoic
Illustrationssketch maps; cross-sections
ProgramConsolidating Canada's Geoscience Knowledge
ProgramTargeted Geoscience Initiative (TGI-3), 2005-2010
AbstractThe northern Cordilleran Orogen of western Canada and Alaska comprises rocks that attest to over 1.8 billion years of tectonic history, from cratonization of the Laurentian continental core to current subduction and transform motion off the west coast today. Evolving tectonic styles, ranging from Proterozoic intracratonic basin formation through Paleozoic rifting through the construction of Mesozoic and younger intraoceanic and continent margin arcs, has led to the wide variety of metallogenetic styles that define the mineral wealth of the northern Cordillera. The northern Cordillera is made up of five large-scale tectonic provinces: the Laurentian craton and its deformed margins; allochthonous terranes of the peri-Laurentian realm, that represent offshore rifted continental fragments, arcs, and ocean basins formed in a setting similar to the modern western Pacific province; the Arctic and Insular terranes, a group of crustal fragments that originated in the Arctic realm between Laurentia and Siberia and were transported separately southwards to impinge on the outer peri-Laurentian margin in Mesozoic time; and the late-accreted Pacific terranes, Mesozoic to Cenozoic accretionary prisms that developed along an active Pacific plate margin with a configuration much like the present one. Each tectonic province carries its own metallogenetic signature. Superimposed postaccretionary magmatic arcs and compressional and extensional tectonic regimes have also given rise to important mineral deposit suites. Seafloor hotspring deposits forming presently along the Juan de Fuca Ridge off the southwest coast of British Columbia show the continuation of Cordilleran metallogeny into the foreseeable future.
GEOSCAN ID224205