GEOSCAN Search Results: Fastlink

GEOSCAN Menu


TitleVolcanogenic massive sulphide deposits
AuthorGalley, A G; Hannington, M; Jonasson, I
SourceMineral deposits of Canada: a synthesis of major deposit-types, district metallogeny, the evolution of geological provinces, and exploration methods; by Goodfellow, W D (ed.); Geological Association of Canada, Mineral Deposits Division, Special Publication no. 5, 2007 p. 141-161
Year2007
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20070192
PublisherGeological Association of Canada, Mineral Deposits Division (St. John's, NL, Canada)
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; DVD
RelatedThis publication is contained in Goodfellow, W D; (2007). Mineral deposits of Canada: a synthesis of major deposit-types, district metallogeny, the evolution of geological provinces, and exploration methods, Geological Association of Canada, Mineral Deposits Division, Special Publication no. 5
File formatpdf
ProvinceBritish Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
AreaKidd Creek; LaRonde; Bathurst; Abitibi; Selbaie; Myra Falls; Trout Lake; Louvicourt; Bouchard-Hébert; Callinan
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Subjectseconomic geology; tectonics; mineral deposits; mineral occurrences; mineralization; volcanogenic deposits; sulphides; sulphide deposits; zinc; copper; lead; silver; gold; base metals; submarine hydrothermal vents; alteration; hydrothermal alteration; tectonic environments
Illustrationssketch maps; cross-sections; tables; ternary diagrams; graphs; plots; photographs
ProgramConsolidating Canada's Geoscience Knowledge
ProgramTargeted Geoscience Initiative (TGI-3), 2005-2010
AbstractVolcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) deposits, also known as volcanic-associated, volcanic-hosted, and volcanosedimentary-hosted massive sulphide deposits, are major sources of Zn, Cu, Pb, Ag, and Au, and significant sources for Co, Sn, Se, Mn, Cd, In, Bi, Te, Ga, and Ge. They typically occur as lenses of polymetallic massive sulphide that form at or near the seafloor in submarine volcanic environments, and are classified according to base metal content, gold content, or host-rock lithology. There are close to 350 known VMS deposits in Canada and over 800 known worldwide. Historically, they account for 27% of Canada's Cu production, 49% of its Zn, 20% of its Pb, 40% of its Ag, and 3% of its Au. They are discovered in submarine volcanic terranes that range in age from 3.4 Ga to actively forming deposits in modern seafloor environments. The most common feature among all types of VMS deposits is that they are formed in extensional tectonic settings, including both oceanic seafloor spreading and arc environments. Most ancient VMS deposits that are still preserved in the geological record formed mainly in oceanic and continental nascent-arc, riftedarc, and back-arc settings. Primitive bimodal mafic volcanic-dominated oceanic rifted arc and bimodal felsic-dominated siliciclastic continental back-arc terranes contain some of the world's most economically important VMS districts. Most, but not all, significant VMS mining districts are defined by deposit clusters formed within rifts or calderas. Their clustering is further attributed to a common heat source that triggers large-scale subseafloor fluid convection systems. These subvolcanic intrusions may also supply metals to the VMS hydrothermal systems through magmatic devolatilization. As a result of large-scale fluid flow, VMS mining districts are commonly characterized by extensive semi-conformable zones of hydrothermal alteration that intensifies into zones of discordant alteration in the immediate footwall and hanging wall of individual deposits. VMS camps can be further characterized by the presence of thin, but areally extensive, units of ferruginous chemical sediment formed from exhalation of fluids and distribution of hydrothermal particulates.
GEOSCAN ID224177