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TitleOn the inventory of the groundwater resources of Canada and the concept of sustainable groundwater development (yield)
AuthorRivera, A
SourceGeo-Engineering for the Society and its Environment: 57th Canadian Geotechnical Conference and the 5th joint CGS-IAH Conference, abstracts; 2004, 1 pages
LinksOnline - En ligne
Year2004
Alt SeriesGeological Survey of Canada, Contribution Series 2004032
MeetingGeo-Engineering for the Society and its Environment: 57th Canadian Geotechnical Conference and the 5th joint CGS-IAH Conference; Quebec City, QC; CA; October 24-27, 2004
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formathtml
ProvinceBritish Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Subjectshydrogeology; groundwater; groundwater resources; groundwater levels; hydrodynamics; hydrologic budget; sustainable yield
AbstractIn Canada, groundwater contributes to about 30 percent of the water supplied by municipal systems, agriculture, and other users. Groundwater use in Canada has seen an important increase since the 1970s; it went from 10% in the late 1960s to 30% in the late 1990s, a 20% increase in less than 30 years. The trends are that groundwater use will continue increasing in Canada. On the other hand, the groundwater resources at the scale of the country remain virtually unknown. The last comprehensive evaluation of the knowledge of the occurrence and hydrodynamic behaviour of groundwater, particularly related to the hydrogeological regions of Canada, was done in 1969 by the GSC (Brown, 1969). In contrast to other developed nations, Canada does not have a national-scale and current inventory of its groundwater resources. As a country, Canada does not have a national strategy to manage water resources, these are managed independently, and sometimes, differently, by the 10 Canadian provinces. Thus, there are no specific plans at the national level. However, a general sense is slowly emerging in that groundwater is to be kept as a strategic resource against climate changes, severe droughts, and/or water exports. The mapping of the groundwater resources of Canada is by no means complete. Coverage is variable among jurisdictions, and what has been accomplished has not been done to consistent standards. Such is Canada's groundwater corundum. This paper introduces the concepts developed to carry out an inventory of the groundwater resources of Canada, with a series of regional-scale assessments of key Canadian aquifers. The sustainable yield concept of regional aquifers is discussed and a working definition is proposed. A very preliminary synthesis of the groundwater fluxes and groundwater stored in aquifers is presented with results from completed regional studies across Canada, as well as the implications for groundwater use and its role in the hydrologic cycle.
GEOSCAN ID215511