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TitleIgneous rock associations in Canada 3. Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) in Canada and adjacent regions: 3 Ga to present
 
AuthorErnst, R E; Buchan, K L
SourceGeoscience Canada vol. 31, no. 3, 2004 p. 103-126 Open Access logo Open Access
LinksOnline - En ligne
Image
Year2004
Alt SeriesGeological Survey of Canada, Contribution Series 2004026
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper
ProvinceBritish Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
AreaGreenland; United States of America; Denmark; Iceland
Lat/Long WENS-159.0000 -12.0000 84.0000 36.0000
Subjectsenvironmental geology; general geology; geochemistry; geochronology; igneous and metamorphic petrology; metallic minerals; mineralogy; structural geology; tectonics; mafic volcanic rocks; basalts; dykes, mafic; dykes; sills; Archean; greenstone belts; komatiites; rifting; mineral exploration; mineral deposits; paleomagnetism; whole rock geochemistry; mantle; LIPs; Large igneous provinces; continental flood basalts; volcanic rifted margins; oceanic plateaus; ocean flood basalts; submarine ridges; seamount chains; mantle plumes; Paleozoic; Proterozoic
Illustrationstables; location maps; aerial photographs; photographs; structural diagrams
AbstractEarth history is punctuated by numerous periods during which large volumes of mafic magma were emplaced. Such magmas not generated by a 'normal' spreading ridge or by subduction are termed Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs), and consist of continental flood basalts, volcanic rifted margins, oceanic plateaus, ocean basin flood basalts, submarine ridges, and seamount chains. Associated felsic rocks may also be present. LIPs of Mesozoic and Cenozoic age are typically the best preserved. Those of Paleozoic and Proterozoic age are usually more deeply eroded, and consist of flood basalt remnants and a deep-level plumbing system (of giant dyke swarms, sill provinces and layered intrusions). In the Archean the most promising LIP candidates are greenstone belts containing komatiites. Many LIPs have been linked to regional-scale uplift, continental rifting and breakup, and climatic crises. They can be used as precisely dated time markers in the stratigraphic record, and are key targets for Ni-Cu-PGE exploration. LIPs have also become a focus in the debate on the existence and nature of mantle plumes. Canada has a rich record of LIPs. At least 80 candidates are recognized in Canada and adjacent regions, with ages ranging from 3100 to 17 Ma. We review proposed links between the LIP record of Canada and mantle plumes, continental breakup, regional uplift, and ore deposits. However, given that many mafic units in Canada remain poorly characterized, a concerted geochronology campaign with integrated paleomagnetism and geochemistry would be invaluable in expanding the application of the Canadian LIP record to solving major geological problems.
GEOSCAN ID215504

 
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