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TitleCanadian framework for collaboration on groundwater
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AuthorRivera, A; Crowe, A; Kohut, A; Rudolph, D; Baker, C; Pupek, D; Shaheen, N; Lewis, M; Parks, K
Source 2003, 55 pages, https://doi.org/10.4095/214620
Year2003
Alt SeriesGeological Survey of Canada, Contribution Series 2003117
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceCanada; Alberta; British Columbia; Manitoba; New Brunswick; Newfoundland and Labrador; Northwest Territories; Nova Scotia; Nunavut; Ontario; Prince Edward Island; Quebec; Saskatchewan; Yukon
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 84; 85; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114O; 114P; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Subjectshydrogeology; groundwater; groundwater resources; groundwater surveys; waste management
Illustrationsphotographs; tables
ProgramGroundwater Geoscience
Abstract(Summary)
Unlike surface water, groundwater is largely invisible to most people. Because of this, groundwater presents some very significant challenges in terms of understanding how it flows through the subsurface, how much there is, how much we can safely extract, and what are the limitations of the resource. Some issues that affect groundwater as a resource include its sustainability with respect to both human use and ecosystems, climate change, and contamination. The Canadian Framework for Collaboration on Groundwater is the result of joint work carried out by a large number of organizations represented by a national ad hoc committee. It was an initiative of the Geological Survey of Canada (Earth Sciences Sector, Natural Resources Canada) based on recommendations from the First National Workshop on Groundwater that was held in 2000 in Québec. The National Ad Hoc Committee on Groundwater was formed to develop a vision, an action plan, and a mechanism to promote, communicate, and implement the framework for collaboration. The draft framework was discussed by a broad range of stakeholders from all levels of government, academia, and the private sector in a Second National Workshop on Groundwater held in Calgary in 2001. During that workshop, a consensus was reached on the document's content and the national ad hoc committee was given the task to refine and publish the document. The extensive consultation and the broad consensus on the Framework established the viability of this vision, and I am confident that it can be achieved. As I write this, some activities are already underway and the Framework is having some impact on renewing water policies and developing agreements between federal and provincial governments and stakeholders. Many of the stakeholders have plans to adopt the vision of the Framework, to do an inventory of the groundwater resources of Canada, to share information, to generate national databases on groundwater that are easily accessible, and to fill in the gaps in groundwater knowledge identified in the two national workshops. The recommendations in this document are aligned with a long-term vision and mission to fill gaps in the knowledge of the country's groundwater resources. The Framework recognizes and strongly emphasizes the need to address the groundwater issues of Canada through close co-operation between federal, provincial, territorial, municipal, and First Nation governments. The development of the Canadian Framework for Collaboration on Groundwater is an important step in furthering the understanding of our groundwater resources, and I would like to thank and congratulate the many stakeholders who have contributed to this Framework. Natural Resources Canada has been pleased to co-ordinate and participate in this effort.
GEOSCAN ID214620