GEOSCAN Search Results: Fastlink

GEOSCAN Menu


TitleActivity cycle of parabolic dunes based on morphology and chronology from Seward sand hills, Saskatchewan
DownloadDownload (whole publication)
AuthorDavid, P P; Wolfe, S A; Huntley, D J; Lemmen, D S
SourceHolocene climate and environmental change in the Palliser Triangle: a geoscientific context for evaluation the impacts of climate change on the southern Canadian prairies; by Lemmen, D S (ed.); Vance, R E (ed.); Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 534, 1999 p. 223-238, https://doi.org/10.4095/211120 (Open Access)
Image
Year1999
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
RelatedThis publication is contained in Lemmen, D S; Vance, R E; (1999). Holocene climate and environmental change in the Palliser Triangle: a geoscientific context for evaluation the impacts of climate change on the southern Canadian prairies, Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin no. 534
File formatpdf
ProvinceSaskatchewan
NTS72K/01NW; 72K/01NE; 72K/08SW; 72K/08SE
AreaPalliser Triangle; Seward sand hills
Lat/Long WENS-108.3333 -108.1667 50.3000 50.2000
Subjectssedimentology; surficial geology/geomorphology; environmental geology; geochronology; stratigraphy; Nature and Environment; dunes; eolian deposits; Holocene; vegetation; sands; sediment transport; erosion; paleoenvironment; radiometric dates; dunes, parabolic; landforms; potassium; uranium; thorium; stratigraphic correlations; climate; optical dates; climate change; Quaternary
Illustrationssketch maps; analyses; aerial photographs; models
ProgramPalliser Triangle Global Change Project
Released2000 01 01
AbstractMorphological and chronological data are used to develop a conceptual model of parabolic sand-dune reactivation and stabilization in response to changing climate, referred to as an activity cycle. The duration of an activity cycle is controlled by moisture availability. Optical ages from the back ridges and dune-track ridges of adjacent dunes in Seward sand hills demonstrate that the last cycle occurred during the nineteenth century. Ages of ridges behind the smaller of two dunes appear congruous, becoming older with depth and younger downwind, whereas those from the larger dune record depositional events subsequent to the formation of major morphological features. Initial rates of dune advance were rapid in response to climatic stress accumulated in the dunes. Water table fluctuations interrupted dune migration at least four times, producing dune-track ridges. Rates of advance following formation of the first dune-track ridge averaged about 2.2 m·a-1, similar to those of presently active dunes in the region.
GEOSCAN ID211120