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TitleGroundwater inputs to a closed-basin saline lake, Chappice Lake, Alberta
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AuthorBirks, S J; Remenda, V H
SourceHolocene climate and environmental change in the Palliser Triangle: a geoscientific context for evaluation the impacts of climate change on the southern Canadian prairies; by Lemmen, D S (ed.); Vance, R E (ed.); Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 534, 1999 p. 81-93, https://doi.org/10.4095/211111 (Open Access)
Image
Year1999
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
RelatedThis publication is contained in Lemmen, D S; Vance, R E; (1999). Holocene climate and environmental change in the Palliser Triangle: a geoscientific context for evaluation the impacts of climate change on the southern Canadian prairies, Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin no. 534
File formatpdf
ProvinceAlberta
NTS72E/01
AreaPalliser Triangle; Chappice Lake
Lat/Long WENS-110.5000 -110.0000 50.2500 50.0000
Subjectsenvironmental geology; hydrogeology; geochemistry; Nature and Environment; Holocene; groundwater; salinity; basins; limnology; hydraulic conductivity; groundwater geochemistry; groundwater flow; hydraulic gradients; piezometric levels; water geochemistry; oxygen isotopes; hydrogen isotopes; aquifers; climate change; Quaternary
Illustrationssketch maps; aerial photographs; analyses
ProgramPalliser Triangle Global Change Project
Released2000 01 01
AbstractThe chemistry and dynamics of groundwater in the Chappice Lake basin were monitored to delineate potential groundwater sources. Slug tests revealed that Chappice Lake is surrounded by a high hydraulic-conductivity system (K=10-5 m·s-1), with the possibility of a confining low hydraulic-conductivity (K=10-7 m·s-1) layer at depth. Measured hydraulic heads and water-table elevations show strong annual fluctuations that correspond with seasonal changes in recharge. The chemical compositions of groundwater springs entering the lake resemble the water chemistry of bedrock aquifers (Na-HCO3) and surficial aquifers (Mg-Ca-Na-HCO3), suggesting that both shallow and deep groundwater systems recharge the lake. However, a strong horizontal component to flow and small upward vertical hydraulic gradients are suggestive of discharge by a shallow groundwater system. Groundwaters sampled at elevations below the lake resemble lake water in both their chemical (Na-SO4) and isotopic compositions, suggesting that they originated as outflow from the lake. This indicates that the lake is not hydrologically closed, despite having no surface outflow.
GEOSCAN ID211111