GEOSCAN Search Results: Fastlink

GEOSCAN Menu


TitleAn over view of the Palliser Triangle Global Change Project
DownloadDownload (whole publication)
AuthorLemmen, D S; Vance, R E
SourceHolocene climate and environmental change in the Palliser Triangle: a geoscientific context for evaluation the impacts of climate change on the southern Canadian prairies; by Lemmen, D S (ed.); Vance, R E (ed.); Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 534, 1999 p. 7-22, https://doi.org/10.4095/211106 (Open Access)
Image
Year1999
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
RelatedThis publication is contained in Lemmen, D S; Vance, R E; (1999). Holocene climate and environmental change in the Palliser Triangle: a geoscientific context for evaluation the impacts of climate change on the southern Canadian prairies, Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin no. 534
File formatpdf
ProvinceManitoba; Alberta; Saskatchewan
NTS62; 63B; 63C; 63D; 63E; 63F; 72; 73A; 73B; 73C; 73D; 73E; 73F; 73G; 73H; 82; 83A; 83B; 83G; 83H
AreaPalliser Triangle; Cypress Hills; Regina
Lat/Long WENS-114.0000 -96.0000 54.0000 49.0000
Subjectsenvironmental geology; sedimentology; Nature and Environment; Holocene; climate; climate effects; climatic fluctuations; environmental impacts; environmental studies; fluvial processes; erosion; groundwater; landforms; mass wasting; eolian deposits; climate change; Quaternary
Illustrationsphotographs; sketch maps; aerial photographs
ProgramPalliser Triangle Global Change Project
Released2000 01 01
AbstractThe Palliser Triangle is the driest portion of the Canadian Prairies, and one of the most climatically sensitive regions in Canada. The potential biophysical impacts of future climate changes are addressed in the Palliser Triangle Global Change Project through an improved understanding of Holocene climate and hydrological changes, and associated landscape response.
Water availability, particularly in relation to groundwater fluctuations, is the single most important factor controlling regional environmental change. Three major intervals are defined for the Holocene, reflecting climate, hydrological, and human factors, and geomorphic activity during those intervals is assessed. Projections of future geological impacts must be based on a thorough understanding of hydrological and geomorphic system dynamics, including the importance of thresholds and antecedent conditions. Systems that are still responding to past major disturbances are unlikely to show a predictable response to climate change. Significant response and relaxation times in many systems indicate that some climate impacts will not be immediately apparent, but may have considerable long-term consequences.
GEOSCAN ID211106