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TitleSensitivity of eolian processes to climate change in Canada
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AuthorWolfe, S A; Nickling, W G
SourceGeological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 421, 1997, 30 pages, https://doi.org/10.4095/209068
Year1997
PublisherNatural Resources Canada
Documentserial
Lang.English
MapsPublication contains 1 map
Map Info.surficial geology, eolian deposits, 1:10,000,000
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceCanada; British Columbia; Alberta; Saskatchewan; Manitoba; Ontario; Quebec; New Brunswick; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Northwest Territories; Yukon; Nunavut; Newfoundland and Labrador
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16; 20; 21; 22; 23; 24; 25; 26; 27; 28; 29; 30; 31; 32; 33; 34; 35; 36; 37; 38; 39; 40; 41; 42; 43; 44; 45; 46; 47; 48; 49; 52; 53; 54; 55; 56; 57; 58; 59; 62; 63; 64; 65; 67; 66; 68; 69; 72; 73; 74; 75; 76; 77; 78; 79; 82; 83; 85; 84; 86; 87; 88; 89; 92; 93; 94; 95; 96; 97; 98; 99; 102; 103; 104; 105; 106; 107; 114; 115; 116; 117; 120; 340; 560
AreaLabrador
Lat/Long WENS-141.0000 -50.0000 90.0000 41.7500
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; sedimentology; environmental geology; eolian deposits; climate, arctic; climatic fluctuations; sand dunes; erosion; environmental studies; environmental impacts; climate; vegetation; sedimentation; Quaternary
Illustrationssketch maps; photographs
Released1997 07 01; 2014 01 20
AbstractA relatively good understanding exists of wind erosion and other eolian processes under present-day conditions, but increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations have raised concerns over the impact of global climate change. Anticipated climate change associated with increased CO2 concentrations could alter existing ecoclimatic regions in Canada. This, in turn, is likely to affect the distribution and relative intensity of eolian and other geomorphic processes. With regards to the impact of climate change, the sensitivity of sand dunes may be viewed, in a simplified manner, as a function of vegetation cover and surface soil moisture conditions, while the risk of wind erosion of bare soils may be considered primarily a function of surface soil moisture conditions.
Under a doubling of atmospheric CO2 scenario, sand dunes in the southern regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan would lie in an ecoclimatic region identified as semidesert, and hence would become even more sensitive. Similarly, dune areas of southwestern Ontario would become more sensitive (the potential for sand dune activity would increase). Under these same hypothetical conditions, the sensitivity of coastal and arctic sand dunes would probably be low. Similarly, the risk of wind erosion of bare agricultural soils would still be greatest and would increase in southern Saskatchewan and Alberta, and probably would also increase in southwestern Ontario and portions of the Maritimes. Changes in intensity of agriculture, together with modification of cropping and management practices could, however, be used to mitigate against these increased impacts.
GEOSCAN ID209068