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TitleSeismologists Can Help Attenuate Some Post - Earthquake Vibrations Among the Public
AuthorLamontagne, M; Du Berger, R; Stevens, A E
SourceEarthquake Spectra vol. 8, no. 4, 1992 p. 573-594, https://doi.org/10.1193/1.1585696
Year1992
Alt SeriesGeological Survey of Canada, Contribution Series 20291
PublisherEarthquake Engineering Research Institute
Documentserial
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
File formatpdf
ProvinceOntario; Quebec
NTS31J; 21L; 21M; 21N; 22D; 32A; 31P; 31I
AreaSaguenay River; Mont Laurier
Lat/Long WENS-76.0000 -70.0000 49.0000 46.0000
Subjectsenvironmental geology; miscellaneous; aftershocks; earthquake studies; environmental impacts; earthquakes; environmental studies; seismicity
Illustrationssketch maps
AbstractVery often after a strongly felt earthquake, the media and the general public consider seismologists to be the source of all information, particularly in regions where earthquakes occur infrequently. Widely felt earthquakes can have a strong social impact (-the post-earthquake vibrations among the public-) whenever the population is unprepared. Since 1935, eastern Canadian seismologists have been involved in four cases of post-earthquake communications with social impact. Recently, seismologists of the Geological Survey of Canada developed a communications strategy to help people cope with post-earthquake stress, particularly that component of stress arising from an insufficient knowledge of earthquakes. A communications plan is prepared before the emergency response period; a high priority is given to those persons who felt the earthquake most strongly; basic information on earthquake phenomena and preparedness is provided; and finally, seismologists make themselves both known and available before and after the earthquake. With this strategy, seismologists can help to relieve unnecessary anxiety and to promote positive preparation.
GEOSCAN ID133525