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TitlePerspectives on Canada's East Coast region
AuthorSavard, J -P; van Proosdij, D; O'Carroll, S; Bell, T; Bernatchez, P; Catto, N; Charles, A; Desjarlais, C; Drejza, S; James, T; Leclerc, L; Martel, N; Morneau, F; Quintin, C; Robinson, C; Warburton, A
SourceCanada's marine coasts in a changing climate; by Lemmen, D S (ed.); Warren, F J (ed.); James, T S (ed.); Mercer Clarke, C S L (ed.); 2016 p. 99-152
Year2016
Alt SeriesEarth Sciences Sector, Contribution Series 20150483
PublisherGovernment of Canada (Ottawa, ON)
Documentbook
Lang.English
Mediapaper; on-line; digital
RelatedThis publication is contained in Lemmen, D S; Warren, F J; James, T S; Mercer Clarke, C S L; (2016). Canada's marine coasts in a changing climate
RelatedThis publication is a translation of Savard, J -P; Savard, J -P; Savard, J -P; Savard, J -P; van Proosdij, D; van Proosdij, D; van Proosdij, D; van Proosdij, D; O'Carroll, S; O'Carroll, S; O'Carroll, S; O'Carroll, S; Bell, T; Bell, T; Bell, T; Bell, T; Bernatchez, P; Bernatchez, P; Bernatchez, P; Bernatchez, P; Catto, N; Catto, N; Catto, N; Catto, N; Charles, A; Charles, A; Charles, A; Charles, A; Desjarlais, C; Desjarlais, C; Desjarlais, C; Desjarlais, C; Drejza, S; Drejza, S; Drejza, S; Drejza, S; James, T; James, T; James, T; James, T; Leclerc, L; Leclerc, L; Leclerc, L; Leclerc, L; Martel, N; Martel, N; Martel, N; Martel, N; Morneau, F; Morneau, F; Morneau, F; Morneau, F; Quintin, C; Quintin, C; Quintin, C; Quintin, C; Robinson, C; Robinson, C; Robinson, C; Robinson, C; Warburton, A; Warburton, A; Warburton, A; Warburton, A; (2016). Perspectives relatives à la région de la côte Est du Canada;
File formatpdf
ProvinceEastern offshore region; New Brunswick; Newfoundland and Labrador; Nova Scotia; Prince Edward Island; Quebec
NTS1; 2; 3; 10; 11; 12; 13A; 13F; 13G; 13H; 20; 21A; 21B; 21C; 21D; 21G; 21H; 21I; 21O; 21P; 22A; 22B; 22C; 22F; 22G; 22H; 22I; 22J
AreaCanada's East Coast; Atlantic Ocean; Labrador Sea; St. Lawrence River; Gulf of St. Lawrence; St. Lawrence River Estuary; Chaleur Bay; Bay of Fundy; Îles de la Madeleine
Lat/Long WENS -72.0000 -52.0000 54.0000 42.0000
Subjectssurficial geology/geomorphology; marine geology; coastal environment; coastal management; climate; temperature; precipitation; oceanography; water temperature; meteorology; storms; sea level changes; sea ice; sediment transport; coastal erosion; ecosystems; acidity; salinity; water quality; economics; vegetation; dunes; climate change; air temperature; wind; coastal dynamics; impacts; adaptation; sediment supply; coastline migration
Illustrationsphotographs; location maps; time series; tables; sketch maps; bar graphs; diagrams; flow charts; pie charts; digital images; models; block diagrams
ProgramCoastal Infrastructure, Climate Change Geoscience
LinksOnline - En ligne (PDF, 3.07 MB)
LinksOnline - En ligne (Full report / Rapport complet)
Abstract(Summary)
Key Findings: Canada's East Coast region is geographically, ecologically and socially diverse, resulting in a wide range of climate change effects and responses. Analysis of existing literature and ongoing adaptation initiatives leads to the following key findings: - Air temperatures, sea-surface temperatures and ocean acidity have all increased in the region during the past century, while sea-ice cover has decreased. Projected climate changes through the 21st century include continued warming of air and water temperatures, and increased precipitation, acidification and water stratification. Sea level will rise, with significant regional variability. Sea ice will decrease in area, thickness, concentration and duration, with volume likely to be reduced by more than 95% by the end of the 21st century. - Sea-ice cover and sea-level rise are key determinants of coastal erosion rates. Increases in coastal erosion have been documented along many coasts in the region during years characterized by mild winters and low ice coverage. Future coastal-erosion rates will likely increase in most areas.
- There are many adaptation measures that promote the resilience of coastal areas. These include protection, revegetation and stabilization of dunes; maintenance of sediment supply; and provision of buffer zones, rolling easements or setbacks that allow the landward migration of the coastline. - Although hard coastal defence structures may be necessary to address sea-level rise and coastal flooding in some situations, particularly in urban areas, such structures disrupt coastal processes and can exacerbate erosion, sedimentation and coastal squeeze, leading to degradation and loss of coastal habitats and ecosystem services. Retreat, sand nourishment and managed realignment represent alternatives to hard coastal-defence structures. - Experience in the East Coast region has shown that mechanisms such as setbacks, which control or prohibit coastal development, can be challenging to implement. However, it is often even more difficult to remove and relocate buildings from an eroding coastline or flood-susceptible area. Selection of appropriate adaptation options may be particularly challenging in unincorporated areas where summer cottages, secondary homes or principal dwellings are established parallel to the shore in a ribbon fashion. - Provinces and communities across the region have made advances in identifying vulnerabilities to climate change impacts through collaboration with academia, the private sector and nongovernmental organizations. Many have begun planning for adaptation, while others have moved from planning to implementation of adaptation strategies, although this remains a challenge for many. Few are engaged in ongoing monitoring of the effectiveness of implemented adaptation strategies.
Summary(Plain Language Summary, not published)
This is a chapter of national report on Canada's coasts in the context of a changing climate. Chapter 4 focusses on the east coast of Canada. Canada's East Coast region is geographically, ecologically and socially diverse, resulting in a wide range of climate change effects and responses. Some findings include: -Projected climate changes through the 21st century include continued warming of air and water temperatures, and increased precipitation, acidification and water stratification. Sea level will rise, with significant regional variability. Sea ice will decrease in area, thickness, concentration and duration, with volume likely to be reduced by more than 95% by the end of the 21st century. -Sea-ice cover and sea-level rise are key determinants of coastal erosion rates. -Adaptation measures that promote the resilience of coastal areas include protection, revegetation and stabilization of dunes; maintenance of sediment supply; and provision of buffer zones, rolling easements or setbacks that allow the landward migration of the coastline.
GEOSCAN ID297829